School of Medicine

Wayne State University School of Medicine

WSU Family Medicine teams up with Detroit Lions Living for the City program

Members of the Food Medicine Interest Group, who are WSU School of Medicine students, volunteer at the showing of A Place at the Table.

Members of the Food Medicine Interest Group, who are WSU School of Medicine students, volunteer at the showing of A Place at the Table.

Dana Rice, Dr.P.H., left,with other guests at the event.

Dana Rice, Dr.P.H., left,with other guests at the event.

Panelists included, from left, Craig Fahle of  WDET; Joe Nader, executive chef, Levy Restaurants- Ford Field; Sara Gold, director of Michigan No Kid Hungry, United Way for Southeastern Michigan; Margit Chadwell, M.D.,WSU Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences; Kami Pothukuchi, Ph.D., associate professor of WSU Urban Planning; and Dan Carmody, president of Eastern Market Corp.

Panelists included, from left, Craig Fahle of WDET; Joe Nader, executive chef, Levy Restaurants- Ford Field; Sara Gold, director of Michigan No Kid Hungry, United Way for Southeastern Michigan; Margit Chadwell, M.D.,WSU Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences; Kami Pothukuchi, Ph.D., associate professor of WSU Urban Planning; and Dan Carmody, president of Eastern Market Corp.

The Wayne State University School of Medicine’s Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences teamed with the Detroit Lions Living for the City initiative to call attention to the issues of food insecurity and hunger in the region.

The Detroit Lions and the WSU department, along with Levy Restaurants, Eastern Market Corp., and Gleaners Community Food Bank, hosted a June 11 charity screening of the film “A Place at the Table” at Ford Field. The documentary investigates incidents of food insecurity in America.

After the film, a moderated panel discussion with some of Michigan’s food economy experts, public health, policy advocates, researchers and physicians took place. Margit Chadwell, M.D., F.A.A.F.P., assistant professor of family medicine and public health sciences, served as a panelist. Dr. Chadwell is co-principal investigator of the federally-funded Bridges to Equity Program housed in the department. The program develops and implements educational programming to engage medical students in inter-professional collaboration with public health students and faculty on community-based projects to reduce health disparities.

Launched in 2012, the Detroit Lions Living for the City philanthropic effort focuses on sustainable community health, wellness and development. Its goals include supporting transformational efforts that improve the well-being of metropolitan Detroit’s underserved. The initiative supports organizations that pursue integrated approaches to physical fitness, healthy eating, housing, land use and environmental planning, public transportation and community infrastructure.

“This collaborative effort is in keeping with our department’s strategic goals, which include increasing our current level of high quality educational presence and community collaboration through service and engagement and contributing to a healthier Detroit and Michigan,” said Juliann Binienda, Ph.D., assistant professor of family medicine and public health sciences, and co-principal investigator of the school’s Bridges to Equity Program. “When we learned that one of the goals of the Living for the City initiative was to improve access to and promote the health and wellness of the residents of the metropolitan Detroit region, we felt that a formal relationship would only help to strengthen both of our goals.”

The Bridges to Equity program, in addition to seeking to increase medical student knowledge and active involvement in reducing health disparities through public health initiatives, works to expand existing integrated population health educational program curriculum in all four years of training in the School of Medicine, and enhance and modify the scope and sequence of the current M.D./M.P.H. degree to emphasize health care equity.

Following the launch of the Living for the City program, Dana Rice, Dr.P.H., adjunct assistant professor of family medicine and public health sciences and wife of  former Detroit Lions safety Ron Rice, began meeting with team officials to discuss ways in which the department could partner with the community program.

“Based on those conversations, we both felt that the relationship between our major academic medical institution and our local NFL team could only enhance both missions,” Dr. Rice said. “We came to the mutual conclusion that formalizing our relationship would ensure the creation of a sustainable partnership for years to come.”
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