School of Medicine

Wayne State University School of Medicine

Students launch Penny War to benefit Safe Kids Coalition

Put the copper in the WSU jar for points. Put higher denominations in the U-M and MSU jars to take points away from those schools.

Put the copper in the WSU jar for points. Put higher denominations in the U-M and MSU jars to take points away from those schools.

A penny never had so much power.

The Wayne State University School of Medicine’s American Medical Association Chapter is engaged in a “Penny War” with its counterparts at the University of Michigan and Michigan State University to raise money for the Safe Kids Coalition in Kalamazoo, Mich.

“It’s a great cause and the perfect time of year for a little in-state rivalry,” said Brandon Busuito, a medical student in the Class of 2014 and AMA chapter external vice president. “We’ve had supportive, enthusiastic experiences with the Safe Kids Coalition previously, so we wanted to help them out.”

Each of the three schools will have a WSU, U-M, MSU jar in which donations can be contributed. Pennies count for points, while silver coins and folding cash detract points. For example, if a donor puts 50 pennies in the WSU jar, the local chapter has 50 points. But if someone puts five dimes in the WSU jar, the points are negated. The goal is to place only pennies in the WSU jar while putting larger denominations in the rival schools’ containers. The same thing will be taking place at U-M and MSU.

The school with the most points wins bragging rights, Busuito said, but the real winner will be the Safe Kids Coalition, which will receive all the money.

The chapter asks that students, faculty and staff build the School of Medicine’s arsenal by dropping pennies in designated jars in the Student Services Office 315 in the Mazurek Education Commons. The collection, which will include students making periodic collection rounds to classes and administrative and staff offices, runs through April 29.

The coalition is part of the Safe Kids USA nationwide network of organizations that work to prevent childhood injury. The coalition, with chapters in all 50 states, teaches families about child injury risks and prevention, encourages and conducts research on injury risks, works to improve child safety laws and regulations, and provides devices such as child safety helmets, seats and smoke alarms.

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