School of Medicine

Wayne State University School of Medicine

Future Docs 2013 opens the door to world of medicine and science for kids

Paul Thomas puts Kayla Blaise's finger in a cast.

Paul Thomas puts Kayla Blaise's finger in a cast.

Ellie Edwards wants to be a doctor, but is a little unsure about holding a cow eye.

Ellie Edwards wants to be a doctor, but is a little unsure about holding a cow eye.

Rebecca Martin and Chloe Knapp clown around at the photo booth, a new feature at this year's Future Docs.

Rebecca Martin and Chloe Knapp clown around at the photo booth, a new feature at this year's Future Docs.

Camille O’Mara, 8, and Emma Rich, 8, examine a cow heart. Camille is the daughter of Leslie Lundahl, Ph.D., assistant professor of WSU Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences. Emma is Camille’s friend.

Camille O’Mara, 8, and Emma Rich, 8, examine a cow heart. Camille is the daughter of Leslie Lundahl, Ph.D., assistant professor of WSU Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences. Emma is Camille’s friend.

More than 400 children and their parents explored the world of medicine and science during Future Docs 2013 at the Wayne State University School of Medicine.

Sponsored by the School of Medicine’s Alumni Association, the March 23 event saw children scramble through the first two floors of Scott Hall and the Kado Clinical Skills Center in the Mazurek Medical Education Commons to engage in hands-on activities at stations to explain various facets of medicine. The event is designed to instill children with an early interest and appreciation for science that may eventually blossom into a desire for a medical career.

Kayla Blaise, 12, of Northfield, already knows she wants to become a physician with an emphasis on medical research.

"I want to cure diseases because I want to make a difference,” Kayla said while having her finger put in a cast by medical student Paul Thomas. “My mom has celiac disease and I want to be able to help her and other people.”

“She has wanted to work on curing diseases for a while now,” her mother, Lanee Blaise, said of her seventh-grade daughter.

Robert Edwards, M.D., Class of 1991 and an Emergency Medicine physician with Providence Hospital and Medical Center in Southfield, brought his daughter, Ellie to Future Docs. Ellie, an 8-year-old third-grader, plans to be a doctor, but isn’t yet sure what specialty she wants to practice. Judging from a bit of squeamishness about holding a cow eye in her gloved hand, ophthalmology might not be in her future.

When an assistant explained to Ellie that the eye she was holding might have some damage of the sort her father would treat in the ER, Dr. Edwards jokingly demurred that it might be something he’d put a patch on and then call for a specialist.

Tamara Martin, M.D., Class of 1992, brought her daughter, Rebecca, 11, and her friend, Chloe Knapp, 11, to Future Docs from Perrysburg, Ohio.

“Chloe wants to be a pediatrician and has since the age of 2,” said Dr. Martin, who practices with Toledo Radiological Associates. “Rebecca has a strong interest in science. And, I wanted them to see where I went to school.”

Chloe’s inclination toward helping others helps steer her desire to practice medicine with children. “I want to help kids be as strong as they can, so that they can grow up healthy,” she said.

Thomas, the fourth-year medical student, is headed to Oakwood Healthcare Inc. for a residency in Family Medicine. Manning the finger-casting station, where visitors could experience having a cast placed on non-broken digits, he summed up the experience for the volunteers.

“It feels good to help, and to show the kids how to explore medicine,” Thomas said.

In addition to exploring the world of medical science, each child received a goodie bag and Future Docs T-shirt. Attendees also enjoyed lunch in the Scott Hall cafeteria.
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